Last edited by Faet
Saturday, July 11, 2020 | History

6 edition of Edo, the City that Became Tokyo found in the catalog.

Edo, the City that Became Tokyo

An Illustrated History

by Akira Naito

  • 394 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Kodansha International .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Asian / Middle Eastern history: c 1500 to c 1900,
  • City & town planning - architectural aspects,
  • Social history,
  • Modern period, c 1500 onwards,
  • c 1500 to c 1600,
  • c 1600 to c 1700,
  • c 1700 to c 1800,
  • c 1800 to c 1900,
  • History - General History,
  • Travel,
  • Japan,
  • Asia - Japan,
  • History / Japan

  • Edition Notes

    ContributionsKazuo Hozumi (Illustrator)
    The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages212
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL9037417M
    ISBN 104770027575
    ISBN 109784770027573

    During the eighteenth century, Edo (today’s Tokyo) became the world’s largest city, quickly surpassing London and Paris. Its rapidly expanding population and flourishing economy encouraged the development of a thriving popular culture. Innovative and ambitious young authors and artists soon began to look beyond the established categories of poetry, drama, and prose, banding together to. Edo, the city that became Tokyo: an illustrated history by Akira Naitō (Book) 8 editions published in in English and held by WorldCat member libraries worldwide.

    In addition, all foreign books were banned. Selected daimyo were also allowed to trade with Korea, the Ryukyu Kingdom and the Ainu in Hokkaido. Despite the isolation, domestic trade and agricultural production continued to improve. During the Edo period and especially during the Genroku era ( - .   Edo was the Shogun’s seat of power before it became Tokyo, Japan’s new capital, in the park’s 25 buildings tell stories of that transitional time and the formative years of the city as it rose from the feudal era to the early space age.

    The flatlands—the Downtown, or Low City—dominated the mercantile culture of Edo. The hilly Uptown, or High City, has been increasingly dominant in the 20th century. The shift may be taken as a concise summary of what has transpired since Edo became Tokyo. Akasaka Aoyama Asakusa Azabu banks became boats bridge brothels building built called citizens of Edo city's cultural district earthquake east Edo Castle Edo period Edo's entertainment famous feudal lords fish Fukagawa garden Gate geisha Ginza grounds hall Hibiya Hongo Honjo houses hundred Imperial inhabitants Japan Japanese Kabuki Kaido Kan.


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Edo, the City that Became Tokyo by Akira Naito Download PDF EPUB FB2

When visiting Tokyo megalopolis, it is hard to imagine that the city has the history of more than 1, years. Akira Naito's comprehensively illustrated the City that Became Tokyo book on history of Edo, currently Tokyo may give you a nice clue to understand the culture and history of Tokyo and the role now-famous Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples had during the rein of Tokugawa Shogun between to /5(4).

From tothe city of Edo was the seat of power of the Tokugawa shogunate and the political center of Japan. In the city was renamed Tokyo and made the official the City that Became Tokyo book of the nation.

Both literally and figuratively, present-day Tokyo rests upon the foundations of Edo, and much of what is now thought of as traditional Japanese culture (woodblock prints, kabuki, sumo, haiku poets.

EDO, the City That Became Tokyo book. Read 2 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. From tothe city of Edo was the seat of p /5. When visiting Tokyo megalopolis, it is hard to imagine that the city has the history of more than 1, years. Akira Naito's comprehensively illustrated book on history of Edo, currently Tokyo may give you a nice clue to understand the culture and history of Tokyo and the role now-famous Shinto shrines and Buddhist temples had during the rein of Tokugawa Shogun between to /5.

Compre online Edo, The City That Became Tokyo: An Illustrated History, de Naito, Akira, Hozumi, Kazuo, Horton, H. Mack na Amazon. Frete GRÁTIS em milhares de produtos com o Amazon Prime. Encontre diversos livros escritos por Naito, Akira, Hozumi, Kazuo, Horton, H. Mack com ótimos preços.5/5(2). Edo, the City That Became Tokyo: An Illustrated History | Naito, Akira, Hozumi, Kazuo, Horton, H.

MacK | ISBN: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher. Edo, formerly a jōkamachi (castle town) centered on Edo Castle located in Musashi Province, became the de facto capital of Japan from as the seat of the Tokugawa grew to become one of the largest cities in the world under the Tokugawa.

After the Meiji Restoration in the Meiji government renamed Edo as Tokyo (東 京, "Eastern Capital") and relocated the Emperor from. Edo, the City That Became Tokyo 作者: Naito, Akira/ Hozumi, Kazuo (ILT)/ Horton, H.

MacK (TRN) 出版社: Kodansha International Ltd,Japan 副标题: An Illustrated History 出版年: 页数: 定价: $ 装帧: hardcover ISBN: The story revolves around a group of men that get tattoos by the most famous tattoo artists in Edo (the city that became Tokyo.) The tattoos are so realistic that they come to life when the gang goes to sleep, setting off an amusing chain of events.

This edition reprints the original woodblock-print book and translates all the dialogue with Reviews: 1. Edo, The City That Became Tokyo An Illustrated History Akira Naito Illustrations by Kazuo Hozumi Translated by H.

Mack Horton From tothe city of Edo was the seat of power of the Tokugawa shogunate and the political center of Japan. In the city was renamed Tokyo and made the official capital of the nation.

The city was renamed Tokyo, meaning “eastern capital.” Edo had been Japan’s largest city since the 17th century. Tokyo’s population exceeded one million in the late 19th century, and as Japan’s political, economic, and cultural centre it became one of the world’s most populous cities in the 20th century.

The city is built on low. Tokyo was originally a small fishing village named Edo, in what was formerly part of the old Musashi was first fortified by the Edo clan, in the late twelfthŌta Dōkan built EdoTokugawa Ieyasu was transferred from Mikawa Province (his lifelong base) to Kantō he became shōgun inEdo became the center of his ruling.

Edo, the city that became Tokyo --Primeval Edo --Ōta Dōkan's Edo castle --Tokugawa Ieyasu's arrival in Edo --Principles of premodern city planning --Construction begins --The layout of subdivisions --Bustling Dōsanbori --The Founding of the Tokugawa Shogunate --A spiral plan for the new city --Improving Edo harbor --Quarrying stone in Izu.

Edo, the City that Became Tokyo: An Illustrated History () Nishiyama, Matsunosuke. Edo Culture: Daily Life and Diversions in Urban Japan, () Novhet, Nohel, and Michele Mills.

The Shogun's City: A History of Tokyo () Raz, Aviad E. Riding the Black Ship: Japan and Tokyo Disneyland. Rozman, Gilbert. History. The site of the city, on what is now known as Tokyo Bay, had been settled for several centuries, but first became historically significant with the building of Edo Castle in by order of Ōta Dōkan.

Kyoto was the site of the Japanese emperor's residence and the capital of Japan for many centuries, until the Tokugawa shogunate was established in and Edo became its seat of.

Tokyo today is one of the world’s mega-cities and the center of a scintillating, hyper-modern culture—but not everyone is aware of its past. Founded in as the seat of the warlord Tokugawa family, Tokyo, then called Edo, was the locus of Japanese trade, economics, and urban civilization untilwhen it mutated into Tokyo and became Japan’s modern capital.

This beautifully. Akira Naito is the author of EDO, the City That Became Tokyo ( avg rating, 15 ratings, 2 reviews, published ), Katsura ( avg rating, 4 rating /5. A little over years ago, Tokyo was a bustling town known as Edo and the seat of the formidable Tokugawa Shogunate.

While the Emperor reigned over Kyoto, the nation’s capital, Tokyo was nothing more than a lively castle how did this city grow to become one of the most powerful cities in the world and the capital of Japan. Yoshiwara (吉原) was a famous yūkaku (red-light district) in Edo, present-day Tōkyō, Japan.

In the early 17th century, there was widespread male and female prostitution throughout the cities of Kyoto, Edo, and Osaka.

To counter this, an order of Tokugawa Hidetada of the Tokugawa shogunate restricted prostitution to designated city districts: Shimabara for Kyōto (), Shinmachi for. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Low City, High City, Tokyo from Edo to the Earthquake: How the Shogun's Ancient Capital Became a Great Modern City, by Edward G.

Seidensticker (, Trade Paperback, Reprint) at. Nominally a history of the city of Tokyo, the book kaleidoscopically describes the cultural life of the whole Tokugawa (or Edo) period: to Naito skillfully condenses his erudition into 87 short essays, each only two to six paragraphs on a two-page spread.

The text, though introductory, is responsibly informative. But the profusion of personal and place names that make sense only to.Edo Tokyo history: Old neighborhoods in the Yamanote area.

The city was split roughly into two—areas in the western foothills, known as Yamanote (yeah, like the train), and Shitamachi, the parts of the city on the flatlands near Tokyo Bay and the Sumida River heart of Edo Tokyo was the Shogun’s castle—now part of the Imperial Palace—and its two encircling moats.There were two parts of Tokyo at the time, Shitamachi and Yamanote.

Another significant change happening then? The Imperial Palace took over Edo Castle. ByTokyo went down in the record books as a legitimate, official city.

It became the capital under Emperor Meiji, who decided to switch the capital of Japan to Tokyo instead of Kyoto.